Author Topic: 8 years old tissue culture teak plantation  (Read 11119 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline muthukuribk

  • FarmNest Member
  • **
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Received: 0
  • Posts: 11
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: seven hills invitro labs pvt ltd tirupati
    • Farm Enthusiast
8 years old tissue culture teak plantation
« on: February 26, 2012, 11:16:23 AM »


8 years old tissue culture teak plantation





farmer name : kusu nasaraiah


village : moguluru
mandal : kanchikacherla
district : krishna
state : andhra pradesh
spacing : 9 feet x 9 feet


soil :sandy loam
plantation age : 8 years
height : 65 feet to 70 feet
girth : 67 cm to 97 cm



mobile no of the farmer : +91 9948225163





We are one and only high yielding tissue culture teak producers in India & abroad

 
M. BALAKRISHNA M. Sc, (Ph.D.),
Managing Director,

Seven Hills Invitro Labs Pvt. Ltd.,
(Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory)
# 125, A.P. Sub Registrars Colony, Timminaidupalem,
Akkarampalli (P) Tirupati 517507
Andhra Pradesh, INDIA.

Mobile: +91 9908286565
muthukuribk@gmail.com, mbalakrishna@shilpindia.net
Website : www.shilpindia.net

 

Offline muthukuribk

  • FarmNest Member
  • **
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Received: 0
  • Posts: 11
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: seven hills invitro labs pvt ltd tirupati
    • Farm Enthusiast
Teak plantations worldwide
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2012, 12:26:18 PM »
Tectona grandis plantations worldwide


The excellent properties and versatile nature of teak (Tectona grandis L. f.) timber and its eminent suitability for an array of uses is well documented. The potential for growing and managing teak in different ecological zones and under different situations (objectives) is being increasingly recognized, leading to intensive domestication and cultivation of the species in countries/regions beyond its natural habitat. Despite the value of teak timber and its increasing demand, its full potential for providing direct revenue as well as value-added down-stream processing and for contributing to the national income has not been fully utilized.



Despite all the efforts invested in reforestation, i.e. 5.7 million hectares planted worldwide in year 2000 according to the FAO (2000), the currently available Tectona grandis (teak) timber resources are far below the needs of the huge worldwide market demand (Ball et al. 2000). In the last TEAKNET (Asia-Pacific Network) meeting held in 1999 in Chiang Mai (Thailand), the lack of planting stock, especially of superior quality, was identified as the primary cause of the teak timber deficit. Increased yield, higher uniformity and shorter rotations are strong incentives for developing the intensively managed T. grandis plantations, which are gaining a worldwide reputation due to the attractiveness and durability of teak wood. Market demands have prompted the establishment of plantations within and beyond its native countries (Hoare and Patanapongsa 1988, Monteuuis and Goh 1999, Bhat 2000).
Although several research projects have refined many aspects of teak silviculture, there are gaps in what is known about managing and use, growing teak in such vital aspects as site requirements, stand dynamics, short-rotation intensive management, wood processing, grading rules and product marketing. The importance of stocking density, for instance, is still vague as thinning intensities and periods have not been properly defined in relation to production objectives. Very often administrative decisions prevail over technical criteria and stands are thinned either too late or less intensively than recommended, causing a negative effect on individual and stand growth. Most of the tree plantations in the tropics grown for saw timber require early, heavy and repeated thinnings in order to sustain their characteristic rapid diameter growth (Galloway et al. 2001). Delaying thinning or carrying out slight interventions at early stages prompts inter-tree competition. On the contrary, too early or too strong interventions, although not common, cause site under-occupancy and the consequent loss in stand productivity.



Teak occurs naturally in parts of India, Myanmar, Laos and Thailand. It has been naturalized in Java, where it was probably introduced some 400-600 years ago (Troup 1921, Kadambi 1972, White 1992). Early introductions of teak outside Asia were made in Nigeria, with the first plantations being of Indian origin in 1902 and subsequently of Burmese origin (Horne 1966). Teak planting in what is now eastern Ghana started around 1905 and a small plantation of teak was established in Côte d’Ivoire in 1929 from plantation seeds obtained from then Togoland. Teak was introduced to countries of Tropical Africa to supplement local timber supplies because of its excellent timber properties. Perhaps the first pure teak plantation in Tropical America was established in Trinidad




In 1913 with seeds from Burma. Teak planting in Honduras, Panama, and Costa Rica started between 1927 and 1929 (Ball et al. 2000).
Teak is the world’s most cultivated high-grade tropical heartwood, covering approximately 6.0 million hectares worldwide (Bhat and Hwan Ok Ma 2004). Of this net area of teak plantations, about 94% are in Tropical Asia, with India (44%) and Indonesia (31%) contributing the bulk of the resource. Other countries of the region contribute significantly with 17% in total (Thailand, Myanmar, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka). About 4.5% of the teak plantations are in Tropical Africa and the rest are in Tropical America, mostly in Costa Rica and Trinidad and Tobago (Pandey 1998). The Asian Pacific region (5.3 million hectares) have been managed under 35 to 80-year rotations , yielding annual productivities of 5 to 20 m3 ha-1 year-1, while teak plantations in Africa (310,000 hectares) are harvested at shorter rotations of 20 years, yielding between 4 and 13 m3 ha-1 year-1 (Bhat and Hwan Ok Ma 2004). Central and South American teak plantations (205,000 ha) are being managed under similar short rotation scenarios of 20-25 years, however they have shown higher yields of up to 40 m3 ha-1 year-1 (average of 20-25 m3 ha-1 year-1 on medium and high quality sites).



Teak has been grown under plantation conditions for 150 years. In the last decade, its high value as timber of excellent appearance and mechanical resistance, and the appearance of strong markets for teak products which parallels an increasingly declining stock of natural stands, have attracted particular attention to the potential of teak plantations as a high return investment possibility (Ball et al. 2000).


We are one and only high yielding tissue culture teak producers in India & abroad

 
M. BALAKRISHNA M. Sc, (Ph.D.),
Managing Director,

Seven Hills Invitro Labs Pvt. Ltd.,
(Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory)
# 125, A.P. Sub Registrars Colony, Timminaidupalem,
Akkarampalli (P) Tirupati 517507
Andhra Pradesh, INDIA.

Mobile: +91 9908286565
muthukuribk@gmail.com, mbalakrishna@shilpindia.net
Website : www.shilpindia.net

 


Offline muthukuribk

  • FarmNest Member
  • **
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Received: 0
  • Posts: 11
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: seven hills invitro labs pvt ltd tirupati
    • Farm Enthusiast
Do not invest Rs 1 ,2, 20
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2012, 01:00:47 PM »
Do not invest Rs 1, for govt supplying teak stumps
Do not invest Rs 5, for reputed nurseries supplying teak stumps
Do not invest Rs 25, for plantation companies supplying teak stumps


Do not wait for 50, 60 years by planting teak stumps.


Expenditure is very high in maintaining stump raised teak plantation

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

EXPENDITURE DETAILS FOR 1 ACRE TEAK PLANTATION

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ORDINARY PLANT AND TISSUE CULTURE TEAK PLANT

Sl.no I year Raising Ordinary plants Tissue culture plants

1 Deep Ploughing Rs. 1500/- Rs.1500/-
2 Pitting 45 cms Rs.3600/- Rs.3600/-
3 Cost of Plants Rs.2250/- (Rs.5/-) Rs.27000/-(Rs.60/-)
4 Cost and Apply of FYM/V.C+DAP Rs.9000/-(Rs.20/- Rs.9000/-(Rs.20/-)
5 Alignment of Planting Rs.900/-(Rs.2/-) Rs.900/-(Rs.2/-)
6 Inter Ploughing Rs.1500/- Rs. 1500/
7 Soil Working Rs.1350/-(Rs/3/-) Rs. 1350/-


Total in I year Rs.20,100 Rs.44,850





Sl.no II year Raising Ordinary plants Tissue culture plants


1 Deep InterPloughing Rs.1500/- Rs.1500/-
2 Application DAP/FYM/V.C Rs.11250/-(Rs.25/-) Rs.11250/-(Rs.25/-)
3 Soil Working Rs.1800/-(Rs.4/-) Rs. Rs.1800/-(Rs.4/-)
4 Maintanance Rs.450/- Rs.450/-



Total in II year Rs.15000/- Rs.15000/-



III Year Maintenance Rs.16000/- Rs.16000/-
IV Year Maintenance Rs.18000/- Rs.18000/-
V Year Maintenance Rs.10000/- Rs.10000/-
VI Year Maintenance Rs.5000/- Rs.5000/-
VII Year Maintenance Rs.6000/- Rs.6000/-
VIII Year Maintenance Rs.7000/- Rs.7000/-
IX Year Maintenance Rs.7000/- Rs.7000/-
X Year Maintenance Rs.4000/- Rs.4000/-
XI Year Maintenance Rs.3000/- Rs.3000/-
XII Year Maintenance Rs.3000/- Rs.3000/-
XIII Year Maintenance Rs.20000/- Rs.20000/-
Unforeseen expenditure Rs. 15900/- Rs.16,150/-



Total expenditure in 18 years Rs.1,50,000 Rs.1,75,000




EXPENDITURE IS ALMOST EQUAL for 17 years.you can cut the tissue culture teak plant by the end of 17 th year.Whereas in stump raised plantation,it would take another 60 to 70 years.For 60 to 70 years expenditure is very high when comparing with TISSUE CULTURE TEAK PLANT.


THINK ONCE AND TAKE FINAL DECISION.FINAL DECISION IS YOURS.



SO YOU GO FOR TISSUE CULTURE TEAK PRODUCED FROM SEVEN HILLS INVITRO LABS PRIVATE LIMITED


WE R ONE AND ONLY HIGH YIELDING TISSUE CULTURE TEAK PRODUCERS IN INDIA AND ABROAD







8.AGRICULTURE SECTOR: Everybody should accept that, the economical growth of every country is depend upon the growth of the Agriculture growth of the country. The remaining sectors growth is also mainly connected with Agriculture sector. It is naked truth, that the farmer and other investors of the Agriculture sector people are satisfying with their minimum returns and some of them are with may be loss in profits. It is true, that there is no FARMER, nothing in this world. Although with expected losses, the farmer is not leaving their Agricultural practices. Moreover, from day to day by implementing innovative methods, the farmer is feeding the whole world of population. It is proving that the Agriculture sector is also becoming very heavy to the farmers, and the other investors of the connected sector.
*
* * * * *In this connection, the Seven Hills Invitro Labs Pvt. Ltd., Tirupati. Is trying *to give the following ideas to the investors of the above sectors to get 100% expected returns for their investment.
*
* * * * Now a days, and for forthcoming years wood industry plays an important role in the economical growth of individual, and also to every country. In wood industry “TEAK WOOD” would be played the prominent role.
*
* * * *In India, America, and Abroad many more surveys are saying that, the economical growth in investment of raising TEAK plantations are the best investment. But, the Teak plantations not with the seed based stumps, but with the high yielding varieties selected clones, that also propagated through tissue culture technique. It is proved that only through clonal teak tissue culture plantations, we can get optimum results in yield. In forthcoming days Teak wood would be the “GOLD OF WOOD”. To meet the future demands of TEAK wood, we the Seven Hills Invitro Labs Pvt. Ltd., Tirupati, is “ONE AND ONLY” in India and Abroad in mass production of selected clones of TEAK tissue culture plants.
*
* * *So, DEAR INVESTORS, please think at once, and don’t hesitate to invest your valuable money in raising of TEAK plantations through the selected clones of Teak tissue culture plants, produced through Seven Hills Invitro Labs Pvt. Ltd., Tirupati.


We are one and only high yielding tissue culture teak producers in India & abroad

 
M. BALAKRISHNA M. Sc, (Ph.D.),
Managing Director,

Seven Hills Invitro Labs Pvt. Ltd.,
(Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory)
# 125, A.P. Sub Registrars Colony, Timminaidupalem,
Akkarampalli (P) Tirupati 517507
Andhra Pradesh, INDIA.

Mobile: +91 9908286565
muthukuribk@gmail.com, mbalakrishna@shilpindia.net
Website : www.shilpindia.net

 

Offline muthukuribk

  • FarmNest Member
  • **
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Received: 0
  • Posts: 11
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: seven hills invitro labs pvt ltd tirupati
    • Farm Enthusiast
Scientists opinion on tissue culture teak
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2012, 05:27:21 PM »
WHY CLONES ARE THE BEST IN TEAK?
OPINIONS OF THE EMINENTS (DAY TO DAY MORE ARTICLES WILL BE ATTACHED); 
1. BY Mr. R. S. NADGAUDA, Mr. S. V. KENDURKAR, and Mr. V. M. KULDKARNI  of NCL , PUNE  on TEAK TISSUE CULTURE FOR IMPROVED PRODUCTIVITY:
Plant Tissue Culture occupies a central position in plant biotechnology, whether it is micro propagation of superior mother clones, conservation of germ plasm, genetic transformation or generation of novel plants through genetic engineering. It has long been realising that, tissue culture micro propagation of superior genotypes can result in capturing genetic gains, leading to increased productivity per unit area. Mass multiplication of the identified plus trees selected for higher growth, disease resistance and wood quality in vitro is known as micro propagation. This method is preferred over the conventional method of rooting; grafting and propagation through seeds as the plants produced are true to type, disease free and can be produced round the year. Here the method of choice is meristem culture.
Tissue culture studies on teak with an aim to develop a micro propagation protocol for rapid multiplication of mature identified mother clones were undertaken way back in late seventies. Extensive studies were conducted on right from germination of seeds in vitro, protocol for seedling multiplication and most importantly culture of meristem from trees (80-100 yr. old) growing in Allapally forest, Maharashtra, India. The constraints of control of phenolics, contamination faced during the initiation and establishment of cultures were combated, shoot cultures were established, further multiplied and rooted in vitro to obtain complete plantlets which were successfully transplanted to soil (Guptha et. al., 1980) Tissue Culture raised plants were field planted at different places in Maharashtra and small scale field trials were conducted in collaboration with Maharashtra Forest Development Corporation, Maharashtra. The data received on the growth performance of these plants was inconsistent and could not be considered for the analysis of growth performance of tissue culture raised plants in the field. However during the same time a field trial in a randomized block design with seven replication was conducted at NCL, Pune to study the growth performance of tissue culture raised plantlets of seedlings and elite tree origin in comparison with seedlings raised from seeds. The significant increases in height and growth were reported in tissue culture raised plantlets of seedling and elite tree origin as compared to seedlings raised from seeds. The elite tree origin showed highest growth increment. Growth performance of these plants has been reported (Mascaranhas et.al., 1987, 1993).
The performance of tissue culture raised plants of teak planted in 1994 at Madhya Pradesh has indicated an average increment of 17.85% for height over control within 6 years. In one of the trials planted using tissue culture raised plants in Chattisgarh, the height increment of tissue culture raised plants is 40.75% higher over control and girth increments 62.09% higher over control at the age of 3 years. The trial conducted at National Chemical Laboratory, Pune using tissue culture raised plants of clones has shown higher growth as against seed raised controls (although it is conducted in loamy soils).
As an outcome of the extensive studies carried out at National Chemical Laboratory, Pune the achievements are very significant. The most striking observations in the field are that tissue culture raised plants showed more than 90% survival, very high uniformity and accelerated growth, resulting into reduction in rotation time. The results of specific gravity analysis are encouraging suggesting that the technology has definite advantages and if exploited commercially, can lead to significant gains.
CONCLUSION OF SEVEN HILLS INVITRO LABS PVT. LTD., TIRUPATI:
We are saying that, not only the opinions of the above eminents, but also many surveys are proving that, selected clones are the best for raising TEAK plantations to obtain maximum yield with maximum reduction of rotation period. By adopting tissue culture technology, We the SEVEN HILLS INVITRO LABS PVT.LTD., TIRUPATI, are producing Andhra Pradesh Forest Department identified TEAK CLONES, what are suitable for planting in all most all the areas in 130 countries in the world, having rainfall in between 400mm to 2000mm above. We are proudly reiterating that, we the SEVEN HILLS INVITRO LABS PVT.LTD., TIRUPATI, is “ONE and ONLY” company got success in giving commercial mass production of selected TEAK CLONES. Hence, dear intellectuals, please think about the facts and come to take an ideal decision in selection of our “SHILP” produced suitable and perfect TEAK CLONES for your planting programmes. Our “SHILP” productions of Andhra Pradesh Forest Department identified and some other important TEAK CLONES



We are one and only high yielding tissue culture teak producers in India & abroad

 
M. BALAKRISHNA M. Sc, (Ph.D.),
Managing Director,

Seven Hills Invitro Labs Pvt. Ltd.,
(Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory)
# 125, A.P. Sub Registrars Colony, Timminaidupalem,
Akkarampalli (P) Tirupati 517507
Andhra Pradesh, INDIA.

Mobile: +91 9908286565
muthukuribk@gmail.com, mbalakrishna@shilpindia.net
Website : www.shilpindia.net

 

Offline dns1807

  • FarmNest Hero
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 5
  • -Received: 132
  • Posts: 613
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: MULABAGILU
    • Farmer
Re: 8 years old tissue culture teak plantation
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2012, 07:16:23 PM »
Sir,
Iam not worry about past and feature. But worried about today's food.
If I go for teak plantation. Than what should I eat now?
Can you come up with any Idea on my/Our Problem?
SWAMY
dns1807@live.in,dns1807@yahoo.com-7760524158-8123019678

Offline vamshi1981

  • FarmNest Member
  • **
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 8
  • -Received: 2
  • Posts: 56
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: Hyderabad
    • Farm Enthusiast
Re: 8 years old tissue culture teak plantation
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2012, 01:32:08 AM »
Sir,

Please provide some qualitative analysis, this does not help us to buy from you. I have seen this all over Internet, what is new that you give me or rather us on this forum. Post something that is useful and I buy some stuff from you, posting technical stuff from Internet will neither help you nor me, if I can read this on forum posted by you, I think I can read more from the Internet on species scientic information and my own hypothicated calculations .

Hope this helps for you to stop spamming here.

Thank you,
Vamshi


Offline dns1807

  • FarmNest Hero
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 5
  • -Received: 132
  • Posts: 613
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: MULABAGILU
    • Farmer
Re: 8 years old tissue culture teak plantation
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2012, 04:26:38 AM »
Dear Sir,
Are you there? Can you come back with clarifications/analysis please?
SWAMY
dns1807@live.in,dns1807@yahoo.com-7760524158-8123019678

Offline skg77

  • FarmNest Fresher
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Received: 0
  • Posts: 2
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: Mumbai
    • Farm Enthusiast
Re: Do not invest Rs 1 ,2, 20
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2012, 08:35:18 PM »
Dear Mr Balakrishnan

I have made payment in your bank for 1000 teak saplings more than 10 days back.

Please let me know the status.

Sanjeev Gupta


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
15 Replies
11371 Views
Last post August 24, 2013, 09:53:12 AM
by Samarthjain
8 Replies
37634 Views
Last post April 08, 2012, 03:52:13 PM
by dns1807
22 Replies
15445 Views
Last post August 06, 2014, 11:49:10 AM
by SAPL
5 Replies
2250 Views
Last post November 17, 2012, 01:09:27 PM
by dns1807
5 Replies
1389 Views
Last post November 13, 2014, 10:13:05 AM
by vinayjan